Hotel Information.


Embassy Suites, 175 East 10th Street, St. Paul, MN, is the conference hotel. They're offering a special rate of $149.00/night for September 22-25, 2016. This offer is available until August 26 or until the block of rooms is sold out.


You can book by going to this special website or calling them at 1-800-hiltons (please, be sure to reference the Midwest World History Conference and dates if you call).


Embassy Suites will be providing a shuttle between the hotel and Metro State campus a couple times a day. Guests at Embassy Suites can park there for free.


There are other hotels in the same area.. 


The parking ramp at Metropolitan State University will be free to all conference attendees. (So if you're driving, perhaps you can offer a ride to someone; the conference registration form asks about ride-sharing.)


Late breaking news of an event!


Anomalous Expansion is a landmark exhibition that features work by six Somali Minnesotan artists — highlighting their art while asking the following questions: What is their role & responsibility as Somali artists? What does s/he have to say, contribute to and produce on the contemporary local and global artscape? In other words, what is his/her artistic station?

Anomalous Expansion elaborates on the significance of the sacred space, the Masjid, as both a public and private sphere — and in this instance serves as an alternative art location that affords these artists the footing to contemplate and address conceptually both the Sublime and the Real through a culturally grounded aesthetic.

Anomalous Expansion features work by Abdi Roble, Aziz Osman, Ifrah Mansour, Kaamil Haider, Mohamed Hersi, and Mohamud Mumin.

Dates: September 17 through October 8, 2016, 4 - 9pm
Reception: September 24, 2016, 5 - 8pm
Venue: Darul Uloom Islamic Center, 977 E. 5th St., St. Paul, MN 55106
Location: 2nd Floor of the School Building


While MWWHA is not organizing a carpool to this event, we thought conference attendees might be interested to know about this event happening immediately after the conference ends. Thank you, Erika Lee, for bringing this to our attention!

Mapping Migrations in World History


The Seventh Annual Conference of the MWWHA


will be held 

 September 23rd-24th, 2016,


at Metropolitan State University in Saint Paul, MN.

Conference Registration.



Here's a checklist to help you not miss any of the conference registration steps.


Every attendee, please:

  1. Complete the Conference Registration by selecting all the options you want (e.g., lunches, seminar) on top of regular conference attendance.

  2. Fill out the Attendee Form. The form will ask you about your lunch preferences, if you chose the lunch option(s). The keynote dinner is included in a regular registration.


The deadline to register for the seminar has passed. If you want to attend the Archival and Cartographic Seminar Friday morning, please:

  1. Fill out the Seminar Form.

  2. Don't forget to select the seminar in the Conference Registrationoptions. 


Outline of Conference Schedule.


(last updated on 29 September 2016)

(All locations are on the Metropolitan State University St. Paul campus except for the seminar Friday morning.)


**Please note: Metropolitan State students are invited to the panels and the keynote talk in the auditorium; if they want to attend more, they need to register for the conference or contact Prof. Grant (history@metrostate.edu) about becoming a volunteer for the conference.**


Thursday evening: pre-conference activities.


Hotel shuttle to campus leaves hotel at 5:45 PM.


Starting at 6:00: a docent-led tour of an exhibit called "Changing America" from the Smithsonian on display at Metropolitan State.

After the tour, we'll carpool over to Hmong Village where there are many choices for dinner; a student-volunteer will give us some guidance!​

We'll carpool back to the hotel afterward.


Friday, 23 September


9:00AM-12:00PM. Archival and Cartographic Seminar, at the University of Minnesota.

**Seminar participants should meet in the main atrium of Andersen Library on the University of Minnesota campus.


11:30AM, 1:15PM, and 1:45PM. Shuttle to campus leaves hotel.


12:00-6:30PM. Registration table open (Great Hall)


12:00-2:00. Optional Lunch (Great Hall)

         (If you don't want to order lunch in advance, there are a few other options nearby, including Alimama (halal food) in the Student Center on campus, and up 7th Street the Dancing Goat, Swede Hollow cafe, and Mississippi Market.)


2:00-3:15. Session 1.


PANEL 1A:  CLIMATE & ENVIRONMENT (LIB 306)


Chair: Nat Godley (Alverno College)


Joshua Eichen (University of Minnesota) “Depopulation and Repopulation in the Americas (1500-1800): Sugar, Migration and Climate in the Longue Durée”
Mark Soderstrom (Aurora University) “The Ecological Thought and the World History Survey”
Shawn Veldey (Metropolitan State University) “Climate Change and Migration"

PANEL 1B:  FROM ANCIENT HISTORY TO CONTEMPORARY EVENTS: THE GLOBAL IMPACT OF MIGRATION (LIB 307)

Chair: Louisa Rice (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)


Rachel Mittelman (Murray State University) “Great Chief or Pharaoh? Libyan Identity in Third Intermediate Period Egypt”

Tolulope Monsiola (University of Minnesota) “Consented or coerced? Trafficking of Nigerian women and girls for sex work in Italy” [was not present at conference]

Mark Welter (University of Minnesota, retired) “Mapping the Effects of the Jewish Baylonian Migration c. 587-538 BCE”

PANEL 1C:  THE ARTS OF MOVEMENT (LIB 308)

Chair: Nikki Magie (Olivet College)


Michal Moskow (Metropolitan State University) and Abdirizak M. Aden (Nugaal University, Somalia) “Here and There in Fiction and Reality: The Dynamics of Somali Migration to Minnesota and Back Again”
David Andrews (University of Minnesota) “A Place in the World: Human and Inhuman Scales in Elizabeth Bishop's Poetry”


3:30-4:45. Session 2.


PANEL 2A: ROUNDTABLE: NAVIGATING TECHNOLOGY IN THE SECONDARY CLASSROOM (LIB 306)

Chair: Tom Barker (South Middle South, Lawrence, KS)


Current education policy and curriculum within the secondary classroom has become obsessed with the integration of technology.  From blended classrooms, 1:1 device initiatives, to online classroom management systems it is often difficult to know how exactly to navigate this shifting educational landscape.  This panel focuses on how four Social Studies secondary educators at both the middle and high school have integrated technology within their classroom.

Eileen Orzoff-Baranyk (Vernon Hills High School, IL)
Susan Smith (Maple Grove Senior High School, MN)
Tom Barker (South Middle School, Lawrence, KS)

PANEL 2B: ROUNDTABLE:  TEACHING MIGRATION HISTORY WITH THE IMMIGRATION STORIES PROJECT (LIB 307)

This panel will provide an overview of Immigrant Stories as a digital storytelling and archiving project, explain how the digital stories in our collection can be used as primary sources for world migration history, and demonstrate our new digital storytelling web application that will help instructors teach their students to make their own digital stories, even if the instructor has not previously taught with digital storytelling.

Elizabeth Venditto (University of Minnesota)
Erika Lee (Director of Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota)

PANEL 2C: MAPPING MIGRANTS IN THE US 1910-1940 (LIB 308)

Chair: Andrae Marak (Governors State University)


Andrew Hoyt, (University of Minnesota) “Italian Migration Beyond Atlantic Gate-Way Cities: Mapping Italian Anarchist Miners across the small towns of north America”
Stephen R. Cusulos (Independent Scholar) “The Syrians of Sioux Falls c. 1927”

Mary-Elizabeth Murphy (Eastern Michigan University) “Mapping Resistance: African Americans, the Great Migration, and Protests against Bus Segregation in the United States, 1920-1940”


5:00-6:30. Session 3. (refreshments in room) (SEC 115)


Plenary session, THE GLOBAL IN THE LOCAL: PRESERVING AND PRESENTING IMMIGRANT HISTORIES


​Scholar-activists have responded to the growing presence of immigrant communities in the Twin Cities by developing new institutions which collect and preserve their stories and records, present their stories to younger generations within their communities and to members of other communities, and place their stories and experiences within contexts. 

Osman Ali (The Somali Museum, Founder and Executive Director) [was not present at conference]
Peter Rachleff (East Side Freedom Library, Co-Executive Director)
Chris Taylor (Minnesota Historical Society, Director of Inclusion and Community Engagement)
Mai Nhia Vang (The Hmong Museum, Founder; and Minnesota Museum of American Art, Collections Manager)


6:30-7:30. Keynote (Auditorium)


GLOBAL MIGRATION CRISES -- CONNECTING HISTORY TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICS


Erika Lee, Director of the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota


7:30-9:00 Dinner (Great Hall) (door prizes will be given away at dinner -- must be present to win!)


9:00 PM. Shuttle to hotel leaves campus.


Saturday, 24 September


8:15AM. Shuttle to campus leaves hotel.


8:30AM-4:00PM. Registration table open (Great Hall)


8:30AM until gone. Breakfast bites. (Great Hall)

Coffee/beverages available all morning. (Great Hall)


9:00-10:15AM. Session 4.


​PANEL 4A: MAPPING MIGRATION IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE (New Main L210)

Chair: Paul Jentz (North Hennepin Community College)


Heather M. Flowers. (Metropolitan State University) “Bordered by Beasts: Mapping Identities in Early Anglo-Saxon England with Animal Style Art”
Deanna Forsman (North Hennepin Community College) “Claiming Transgression: Spiritual Migration in Late Antique Christian Thought”

James G. Schryver (University of Minnesota, Morris) “Medieval Migrations and Modern Identities”


PANEL 4B: MIGRATION AND THE MAKING OF THE UPPER MIDWEST (New Main L213)

Chair: Louisa Rice (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)


Samantha Kailas (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) “How Immigrants Made Milwaukee: Analyzing the Intersection of Immigration and Class Mobility in Riverwest, Milwaukee”
Tiffany Trimmer (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse)“ ‘Come and See’: Migration-Related Marketing and How La Crosse, WI fits into World History”


10:00AM. Shuttle to campus leaves hotel.


10:15-10:45AM. Coffee break. (Great Hall)


10:45AM-12:00PM. Session 5.


PANEL 5A: MUSLIM MIGRANTS IN THE 20th-CENTURY MIDWEST (New Main L214)

Chair: Steve Glazer (Graceland University)


Ruth Smith, (Ohio State University) “Examining and Engaging in Community Building Processes Among Second Generation Muslim Migrants”
Marcus Smith, (Purdue University) “Muslim Columbus: Diversity and Unity in a Midwest American Religious Community”
Kate Lang, (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire) “Arab Americans in Northwest Wisconsin: Many Voices”

PANEL 5B: REVOLUTION, EXILES, AND EMOTION IN EUROPE (New Main L213)

Chair: Mark Soderstrom (Aurora University)


Christopher Marshall, (University of Wisconsin-Stout) “To the Barricades for Free Poland: Polish Exiles and Revolutionary Migrants and the Paris Commune of 1871”
Chris Rominger, (City University of New York) “A community of emotions and hopes: Tunisian Anti-colonial exiles in Neutral Switzerland 1914-1919”
Mary Duarte, (Cardinal Stritch University) “A Change So Brusque”

PANEL 5C: WHO AM I? MIGRATION AND IDENTITY FORMATION (New Main L215)

Chair: Eileen Orzoff-Baranyk (Vernon Hills Middle School, IL)


Julie Tanaka, (University of Notre Dame) “Encounters with the Foreign: German Identity in Early Modern Travel Accounts”    
Nikki Magie, (Olivet College) “Migrant Stories in a World on the Move 1870-1920”

Jonathan Dresner, (Pittsburg State University) “Migration and Modernity in East Asia”


12:00-2:00PM. Optional Lunch (Great Hall)

     

1:00-2:00PM. Executive Committee Meeting, all MWWHA members welcome. (LIB 302)


2:00-3:15. Session 6.


PANEL 6A: ROUNDTABLE: DEEPENING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT IN WORLD HISTORY THROUGH NATIONAL HISTORY DAY (LIB 306)

This panel will discuss how the National History Day program facilitates deeper engagement in World History classrooms through advanced research projects. Panelists will introduce the History Day program, provide examples of research support services through library partnerships, and discuss the application of History Day in the classroom. A student presentation will illustrate a World History topic from 2016. Overall, participants will come away with an understanding of the structure and classroom application of National History Day and how to support students as they address the challenges and opportunities of researching a World History topic.

Molly Strother (Capitol Hill Magnet School)
Matthew King (History Day Graduate Assistant, Minnesota Historical Society and University of Minnesota)

PANEL 6B: ISLANDERS ON THE MOVE (LIB 307)

Chair: Tom Barker (South Middle School, Lawrence, KS)


Justin Masucci, (SUNY Buffalo) “Crisis in the New Colony: The Emigration of Virgin Islanders during the early years of U.S. Colonialism”

Blair Williams (University of Minnesota) “The King Reborn: Oh Sadaharu and Japanese Identity in Cold War Japan”

PANEL 6C: ARAB MIDDLE EAST (New Main L213)

Chair: Kate Lang (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)


James Tallon, (Lewis University)  “Scramble for Arabia: The Ottoman Empire, the British, and Arab States Struggle for Dominance, 1903-1925”

Yusri Haizran, (Free University, Berlin) “Why are Christians Leaving the Arab Middle East? [was not present at conference]


3:15-3:45. Coffee break. (Great Hall)


3:45-5:00. Session 7.


PANEL 7A: MIGRATION AND MEXICO (LIB 306)

Chair: Justin Quinn Olmstead (University of Central Oklahoma)


Andrae Marak (Governors State University) and Elaine Carey (St. John’s University), “Drugs, Mobility, and Automated Borders”
Joseph Lenti (Eastern Washington University) “Invasores: Land Invasions and Government Responses at the end of the Mexican ‘Miracle’”
Maria Duarte (Grand Valley State University), “To Protect and Control: Mexican Consuls on the Texas Borderlands at the turn of the Twentieth Century”


PANEL 7B: AGRICULTURE, HOMESTEADING AND THE WEST (New Main L213)

Chair: Susan Smith (Maple Grove Senior High, MN)


Margaret Vaughan, Metropolitan State University) “The Representation of Native Peoples and Indigenous Seeds in Select U.S. Discourses of WWII”                                   

Katie Weichelt, (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire )“Birthing on the Plains: Migration, Homesteading and Maternal Health in Two Rural Counties

Brenda Thacker, (University of Missouri, St. Louis) “Mapping Cholera and Westward Migration”


5:30PM Last shuttle to hotel from campus.
















Metropolitan State University

700 East Seventh Street, Saint Paul, MN 55106